Date Archives: 22-Dec-2016

Question: The IV Therapy Medical Directive lists hypotension as a required indication for a fluid bolus. In pediatric medicine, blood pressure is rarely used alone as an indication of perfusion and tends more to rely on looking at the overall presentation including: level of awareness/activity, heart rate, capillary refill etc.

If presented with a child who is: irritable, tachycardic (or bradycardic for that matter), with delayed cap refill, and decreased urine output, but is not hypotensive (<5th percentile), is it permissible to administer a fluid bolus?

Question: If a patient is presenting with signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia (confusion, diaphoresis, pallor, tachycardia, etc.) and you find them with a BG of 4.5mmol/L, but family on scene states their normal BG is over 12mmol/L, and that they are presenting as they typically do when their blood sugar is low, AND you cannot identify from assessment/history any other reason for their current presentation, is it advised to give them oral glucose at this point if they are able to swallow?