Category Archives: Medical Directives

Question: If we are presented with a hypoglycemic patient that demonstrates signs and symptoms of a TIA/CVA (slurred speech, inability to hold arms/legs up or due to confusion a grip test) and once the hypoglycemia is reversed with treatment and those signs and symptoms are gone, can we now deliver Ibuprofen/Acetaminophen or Ketorolac if the patient complains of CA related pain or muscle strain as per the Adult Analgesic Protocol?

Question: There was a discussion among crews surrounding DNRs and our permitted treatment such as epi can be given for anaphylaxis or silent chest, but not as a pressor as listed on the DNR. That being said, I found a previous Ask MAC question where you addressed isolated epi administration as not very effective (where the BVM is contraindicated due to a valid DNR) in the situation of severe bronchoconstriction. Wondering if the same logic applies to the setting of anaphylactic VSA patients? If we cannot begin CPR or utilize a BVM, should we give isolated epi to that patient, as it is not being given as a pressor? (I'm of the opinion that a VSA patient gets no treatment in the presence of a DNR).

Question: This question is in regards to hypoglycemia mimicking a stroke. You arrive on scene and the patient is presenting with the classic signs of a stroke such as facial droop, arm drift etc. Patient is out of the stroke protocol since GCS was <10, and the patient was terminally ill due to cancer, with a valid DNR. I obtain a BGL and the BS comes back as a 3.0mmol, so I correct the hypoglycemic event. Moments later a second BS was taken and it comes back as 4.1mmol. Another stroke assessment was done, with no signs and or symptoms of a stroke. Patient then complains of severe cancer related pain in her abdomen. My question is now, would I have been save in not giving the patient any NSAIDS since one of the contraindications was "CVA or TBI within previous 24 hours?" I ended up giving Acetaminophen since I thought doing something is better than nothing for the patient’s abdomen pain. Along with that, I didn't know if the patient experienced both a CVA and a Hypoglycemic event together at the same time, or if the patient experienced a stroke hidden in with the hypoglycemic event. What are your thoughts?

Question: In the Bronchoconstriction Medical Directive, would a patient ever receive salbutamol followed by epinephrine? Is epi there in case that the patient does not respond to salbutamol and instead gets worse after salbutamol administration? If the patient does not require epi at first, but instead is given salbutamol, then gets worse requiring epi, could that epi administration follow with salbutamol again?

Question: How can someone differentiate between crackles found in Acute Cardiogenic Pulmonary Edema between those found in pneumonia?

Question: With respect to the updated July 17, 2017 medical directive changes, are hangings, electrocution and anaphylactic cardiac arrests considered reversible causes of arrest, and therefore subject to consideration for early transport after 1 analysis, OR are they to be run as full medical cardiac arrests/4 analyses, regardless of whether defibrillation is indicated? Thank you.

Question: In a situation where we are unable to get a blood glucose reading from the patient's finger due to patient being combative/handcuffed, are we allowed to get it from the toes of the patient?

Question: When running an ALS arrest where the patient is showing a PEA on the monitor with an accompanying high ETCO2, could we assume that this patient is in fact perfusing to some degree and pulses are just not palpable for various reasons (obesity, severe hypotension, etc.)?

Secondly, if the above assumption is correct, would it be prudent to stop CPR provided the ETCO2 remains high and administer Dopamine in hopes of increasing BP until pulses are palpable and BP obtainable; or should the vasopressor effects of Epinephrine be sufficient to facilitate this so just continue with Epinephrine q5 min and CPR?

Question: After consistent review of the new ALS, I just came across something that I am hoping you may clarify for me. In regards to the Medical Cardiac Arrest directive, under the "clinical considerations," it states that under certain circumstances we transport after first rhythm analysis (and lists some examples). In the old ALS, one of these examples was "pediatrics" but now i notice that in the new ALS, also under clinical considerations, it mentions to plan for extrication and transport of pediatric cardiac arrest patients after 3 analyses. So, does this mean we do not transport after first rhythm analysis for pediatrics and must complete the full directive now?

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