Author Archives: SWORBHP

Patient Presentation: 40 year old female has sudden onset diaphoresis, nausea and weakness. She has slight discomfort in the left shoulder and upper back. PMHx: Stressful home/work life, but otherwise healthy. Meds: None.

What is YOUR interpretation?

Patient Presentation: 66 year old male has sudden onset chest heaviness and shortness of breath while getting ready for bed. PMHx: Smoker, hasn’t been to a doctor in years. Meds: None.

What is YOUR interpretation?

Patient Presentation: 49 year old male has sudden onset tightness in the middle of the chest after eating dinner. He thinks it might be heartburn. Discomfort is non-radiating and non-reproducible and there is no past medical history/medication use.

What is YOUR interpretation?

Patient Presentation: 80 year old male has sudden onset chest heaviness and mild shortness of breath while walking two flights of stairs. PMHx: Angina, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, NIDDM. Meds: Nitroglycerin, Metoprolol, Lipitor, ASA, Glucophage.

What is YOUR interpretation?

Patient Presentation: 45 year old male has sudden onset pain and tingling down the left arm and up into jaw while playing hockey. PMHx: Generally healthy, plays hockey weekly. Meds: None.

What is YOUR interpretation?

Patient Presentation: 56 year old male was woken from sleep by sudden onset severe chest heaviness and feeling like he had the ‘wind knocked out of him’. PMHx: Healthy, runs 3x/week. Meds: None.

What is YOUR interpretation?

Question: Can you give Ketorolac to a HTN patient (180 systolic)? The PCP directive states Normotension.

Question: In Elgin county we have been having trouble with our defibs spitting out 'noisy data' warnings on our 12 lead ECG's lately which has prompted conversation with crews about the STEMI protocol. Though the protocol clearly states that LP15 ECG software interpretation meets ***MEETS ST ELEVATION... some crews are saying that due to this issue with noisy data, we are able to interpret the ECG on our own and determine if it meets our criteria based on the >1 mm/or the >2mm ST elevation criteria. Your thoughts? Should we patch the cardiologist? Should we transport to nearest ED due to software not recognizing due to noisy data?

Question: We were presented with a patient on scene who stated she had fallen 2 hours prior. The fall was due to a slip on the ice. There was no LOC, no head injuries or any other neuro deficits. The patient’s vitals weren't abnormal and was in a mild state of distress on scene. The only injuries noted were some wrist and knee pain, where there was no obvious deformity or injuries evident but stated both as 7/10 pain. She also mentioned her back was in moderate pain from the fall as well. My partner and I were unsure of whether to provide symptom relief for pain management. Yes there is trauma to 2 different extremities but it was the simultaneous back pain that threw a twist in, as the directive states that the patient must have "isolated hip or extremity trauma." We were minutes from the hospital and I did ask the patient if the pain was tolerable until we got to the hospital where they would provide more effective pain management, but for future reference it would be nice to no! t have to think twice if put in this particular situation again.

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